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January 7 2019

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EXECUTIVE COMMENTARY | Logistics 2019 ANNUAL REVIEW & OUTLOOK Januar y 7 2019 | The Journal of Commerce 123 www.joc.com that already has the rules of multiple trade agreements and allows you to manage all of your agreements on one platform is more important than ever. You need as much flexibility as possible to leverage different trade agreements for different regions and products. Some companies shy away from fully leveraging FTAs due to lack of familiarity, but that is not necessary as there are consulting and managed services firms that specialize in set - ting up and managing FTAs around the world. With the right technology and familiarity of the industry, sub - stantial benefits can be reaped. FTZs have been around for quite some time and are an ideal tool for managing uncertainty; however, the technology now exists to help companies maximize savings across the entire supply chain, not just one distribution center or manufacturing facility. Blockchain is the technology that I believe has been overhyped for the near future. I do believe there are principles that will be adopted and benefit supply chains greatly over time; however, at times there is a lack of appreciation of what it takes to implement across supply chains and an exaggerated expectation of the short-term benefits. Advent Intermodal Solutions Allen Thomas Chief Strategy Officer www.adventintermodal.com I want visibil- ity! For too long now that's been the ask from ship - pers and their logistics part- ners … give me predictive visibility into my supply chain that helps shine a light into the black holes where containers get lost. While many tout "digitization" proj- ects within a company, it seems the missing link is transparent, digital collaboration between partners and solution providers. By engaging in open digital part- nerships, say within a port complex, those transporting freight could come and go from ports, depots, and inland distribution centers with complete autonomy … entirely unaffected by people and absent of lines. A huge problem in the flow of containerized cargo exists in the places it's stored … specifically at ports, inland depots, and distribution centers. Truckers responsible for the pickup and movement of these millions of containers routinely wait hours (both inside and outside of these facilities) while people make preparations to ensure the right con - tainer is delivered to the right truck. But what if these same truckers could just drive in, go right to their container, have it delivered, and then just drive out? Turns out this exact process is already happening at several container terminals in the US. Here's our big problem … how to extend this process to all container storage loca - tions, wherever the cargo moves (and 319 Capital Partners Tom Barnes CEO Tom.Barnes@319capitalpartners.com With the cur- rent uncertainty regarding tariffs, free trade agree - ments (FTAs) and foreign trade zones (FTZs) provide companies with the tools to help mitigate unex - pected increases in their cost structure. However, both FTAs and FTZs require specialized knowledge and clear con - trol of your information and products. Creating the infrastructure to manage or even understand what it takes to manage these programs is important, because if done wrong, it could wreak havoc on your supply chain. However, if done right, it can provide significant savings while improving the flow and speed of your supply chain. Although the general concept of managing FTAs is not new, the importance of having a platform Amber Road Jim Preuninger CEO www.amberroad.com Over the past few years, there have been many technologies that have surfaced to the top of minds within the logistics industry. I like to divide them into three distinct groups. The first group, Internet of Things (IoT) and Big Data, has the best potential for near-term value creation. IoT technology can produce an incredible amount of data in an automated way; data that pertains to things like shipment location, product condition and more. When this data is combined with transactional, product, and other data sources, valuable insights can be created; and when analyzed over time — this is commonly referred to as Big Data. The number of use cases for IoT and Big Data in logistics is practically limitless. The second group is comprised of artificial intel - ligence (AI), machine learning, and robotic process automation. It is still unclear to most supply chain professionals as to the definition of each. In my opinion, AI should be reserved for very advanced use cases, such as automated self-driving trucks. Machine learning is akin to an expert system that can be thought of as artificial intelligence within a specific domain. A machine learning system uses data in a con - tinuous manner to determine better answers. A good example of this is using historical transit data to better predict ETAs in real-time. Robotic process automation is simply good old-fashioned automation, which has been used by enterprise software to automate vari- ous aspects of the supply chain for years. The third is Blockchain. Blockchain appli- cations are underpinned by a technology called distributed ledger. While there are certain use cases within the logistics world that are helped by this technology, many software vendors are applying this technology to solve problems that do not derive any ben- efit from it. Time will tell if real and valuable Blockchain applications gain traction in this industry. The technology now exists to help companies maximize savings across the entire supply chain, not just one distribution center or manufacturing facility. ▶ Tom Barnes A huge problem in the flow of containerized cargo exists in the places it's stored The number of use cases for IoT and Big Data in logistics is practically limitless.

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