Digital Edition

August 28 2023

Issue link: https://jocdigital.uberflip.com/i/1505799

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 19 of 55

20 Journal of Commerce | August 28, 2023 www.joc.com Container Shipping Quarterly Special Report Journal of Commerce Top 50 Container Carriers by Fleet Capacity Total capacity of existing vessel fleets and on order, in TEUs, as of Aug. 8, 2023 As of Aug. 8, 2023, S&P Global calculates the current active global container vessel fleet has an aggregate capacity of just under 26.8 million TEUs. The top 10 container carriers by vessel capacity control 89.3% of the global fleet with 22.35 million TEUs in capacity. The top 10 fleet operators have an additional 5.54 million TEUs in fully cellular capacity on order, representing 24.8% of their existing fleet capacity. Existing Cellular Fleet Orderbook Rank Ocean Carrier Market share Capacity Capacity % of Existing Fleet 1 MSC 20.2% 5,049,908 1,358,928 26.9% 2 A.P. Møller - Maersk* 15.7% 3,929,560 277,484 7.1% 3 CMA CGM/APL 13.8% 3,446,015 1,093,440 31.7% 4 Cosco Shipping/OOCL 11.7% 2,921,704 696,280 23.8% 5 Evergreen Line 6.6% 1,641,896 660,376 40.2% 6 Ocean Network Express 6.5% 1,632,903 487,008 29.8% 7 Hapag-Lloyd 6.5% 1,631,707 312,260 19.1% 8 HMM 3.3% 826,971 265,027 32.0% 9 Yang Ming Line 2.9% 726,039 89,300 12.3% 10 Zim 2.2% 543,716 300,000 55.2% Top 10 Container Carriers 89.3% 22,350,419 5,540,103 24.8% 11 Wan Hai Lines 2.0% 505,008 167,726 33.2% 12 Pacific International Lines 1.1% 263,645 89,259 33.9% 13 SITC 0.7% 174,525 16,938 9.7% 14 KMTC 0.6% 143,301 0.0% 15 X-Press Feeders Group 0.5% 135,399 105,610 78.0% 16 SFL Management Singapore 0.5% 123,597 0.0% 17 Sea Lead 0.5% 118,704 0.0% 18 IRISL Group 0.5% 114,073 0.0% 19 Sinokor Merchant Marine 0.3% 86,020 84,518 98.3% 20 TS Lines 0.3% 75,903 1,182 1.6% 21 Regional Container Lines 0.3% 68,743 51,700 75.2% 22 UniFeeder 0.3% 62,785 0.0% 23 SM Line 0.2% 57,752 0.0% 24 Swire Shipping 0.2% 54,084 0.0% 25 Matson 0.2% 49,287 10,860 22.0% 26 Global Feeder Shipping 0.2% 40,821 0.0% 27 Sinotrans 0.2% 38,920 9,600 24.7% 28 CULines 0.1% 33,710 24,213 71.8% 29 Arkas Line 0.1% 32,550 3,100 9.5% 30 Salam Pacific Indonesia Lines 0.1% 31,868 500 1.6% 31 Interasia Lines 0.1% 31,436 20,139 64.1% 32 Shanghai Jin Jiang Shipping 0.1% 31,000 7,600 24.5% 33 Tanto Intim 0.1% 30,978 0.0% 34 Emirates Shipping Line 0.1% 30,405 0.0% 35 Ningbo Ocean 0.1% 29,830 4,200 14.1% 36 Great White Fleet 0.1% 28,399 0.0% 37 Asyad Line 0.1% 28,108 0.0% 38 Shoei Kisen Kaisha 0.1% 28,104 1,984 7.1% 39 Seaboard Marine 0.1% 25,915 3,618 14.0% 40 Transworld Group Singapore 0.1% 25,868 0.0% 41 Samudera Shipping Line 0.1% 22,017 0.0% 42 Namsung Shipping 0.1% 21,996 2,556 11.6% 43 Tailwind Shipping Lines 0.1% 20,430 0.0% 44 Asean Seas Line Co 0.1% 19,917 6,560 32.9% 45 Eurobulk Ltd 0.1% 18,318 16,555 90.4% 46 FESCO 0.1% 18,187 0.0% 47 Meratus Line 0.1% 17,132 1,800 10.5% 48 Oceonix Services 0.1% 16,953 0.0% 49 Sima Marine India 0.1% 16,407 0.0% 50 VINALINES 0.1% 16,248 5,618 34.6% Total Top 50 Container Carriers 100% 25,038,762 6,175,939 % share of Top 50 TEU operating capacity 100% 24.7% All subsidiaries are consolidated. Global TEU fleet share is based upon the operator's existing fleet TEU capacity. A.P. Møller - Maersk includes Maersk Line, Sealand, Safmarine, and Hamburg Süd. Source: S&P Global, Sea-web Only six carriers in the top 40 grew their US import volumes, and only one of those — Great White Fleet, up 7.8% — was starting from a base of more than 12,000 TEUs for the period. On the export side, CMA CGM proved its staying power atop the rankings, growing volumes 6% in the first five months of 2023 against an overall market gain of 2.2%. ONE rose to No. 4 from No. 6, surpassing Cosco and Hapag-Lloyd, thanks to an 11.5% jump in exports carried, while HMM rose to No. 8 from No. 10 and Yang Ming leapt to No. 9 from No. 11 on respective volume increases of 9.9% and 11.9%. In all, only 17 of the top 40 car - riers grew their export volumes, but those increases were enough to offset declines among the other 23 lines. For ocean carriers, the softness of the US import market has been exac- erbated by an excess of vessel capacity, a dynamic that will only accelerate as even more new, larger ships are deliv- ered over the next two years. As of early August, the combined capacity of the global container ship fleet had grown 3.8% year over year to just over 25 million TEUs, accord- ing to the Journal of Commerce's Top 40 Container Carriers by Fleet Capacity. But when all the vessels currently on order are delivered, that number will jump another 24.7% to 31.2 million TEUs. Among individual carriers, MSC not only has the largest container vessel fleet by capacity but also the largest order book. Assuming no addi- tional orders, MSC will add 1.4 million TEUs of capacity to its already consid- erable 5 million-TEU fleet, increasing its share of the global fleet to 20.5% from 20.2% currently. CMA CGM, which sports the second-largest order book at roughly 1 million TEUs, will increase its share of the overall fleet to 14.5% from 13.8%, moving past Maersk and into the No. 2 spot in the rankings. Maersk, which had been the largest carrier by fleet capacity for years until MSC passed it in 2022, will see its share shrink to 13.5% from 15.7% once all the new ships are deployed, thanks to a relatively small order book of 277,484 TEUs. JOC email: teri.griffis@spglobal.com

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of Digital Edition - August 28 2023